Untitled

Who we should be disgusted with when private pictures of famous women are leaked without their consent: the person who leaked them.

And that’s it.  Really.

A large number of American teenagers live exactly like Michael Brown. Very few of them are shot in the head and left to bake on the pavement.
The “angelic” standard was not one created by the reporter. It was created by a society that cannot face itself, and thus must employ a dubious “morality” to hide its sins. It is reinforced by people who have embraced the notion of “twice as good” while avoiding the circumstances which gave that notion birth.

—Ta-Nehisi Coates, "Michael Brown’s Unremarkable Humanity," The Atlantic. (via asuperfluousman)

(via librarienne)

cyborg-femme:

"John Lennon Syndrome"

A white guy who preaches peace/love/good gender politics but is an abusive asshole to the people he is close to and does not uphold those values in his personal life.

(via lillabet)

It is not “black on black crime” that is background noise in America, but the pleas of black people.

There is a pattern here, but it isn’t the one Eugene Robinson (for whom I have a great respect) thinks. The pattern is the transmutation of black protest into moral hectoring of black people. Don Imus profanely insults a group of black women. But the real problem is gangsta rap. Trayvon Martin is killed. This becomes a conversation about how black men are bad fathers. Jonathan Martin is bullied mercilessly. This proves that black people have an unfortunate sense of irony.

The politics of respectability are, at their root, the politics of changing the subject—the last resort for those who can not bear the agony of looking their country in the eye. The policy of America has been, for most of its history, white supremacy. The high rates of violence in black neighborhoods do not exist outside of these facts—they evidence them.

Jonathan Foreman said that the Church is made up of “the dropouts, the losers, the sinners, the failures and the fools.” I like that.

My friend, Bing, always tells me that the best way to know Jesus is to leave the church for a while. To get away from the congregation and go back to the basics, to a personal and real encounter. In other words: a friendship. I’ve since returned to the church. I don’t always agree with it but I do love it. I don’t always like the culture of the people but I’ve made my decision to love them, forgive them and be kind to them because that’s what God did for me. And I will never be above God.

I am still learning and I’m still a work-in-progress and I am most definitely still a sinner. But in the aftermath of all that has happened between me and the church, I’m learning to re-define love for myself.

—Isa Garcia, Everyday Isa (My Issue with Church)

(via redeemedandloved)

thoughtsofablackgirl:

Hedy Epstein, a 90-year-old Holocaust survivor was arrested on Monday during unrest in Ferguson Epstein, who aided Allied forces in the Nuremberg trials, was placed under arrest “for failing to disperse.” 8 others were also arrested.
"I’ve been doing this since I was a teenager. I didn’t think I would have to do it when I was ninety," Epstein told The Nation during her arrest. “We need to stand up today so that people won’t have to do this when they’re ninety.” Epstein is currently an activist and a vocal supporter of the Free Gaza Movement. 

thoughtsofablackgirl:

Hedy Epstein, a 90-year-old Holocaust survivor was arrested on Monday during unrest in Ferguson Epstein, who aided Allied forces in the Nuremberg trials, was placed under arrest “for failing to disperse.” 8 others were also arrested.

"I’ve been doing this since I was a teenager. I didn’t think I would have to do it when I was ninety," Epstein told The Nation during her arrest. “We need to stand up today so that people won’t have to do this when they’re ninety.” Epstein is currently an activist and a vocal supporter of the Free Gaza Movement. 

(via eleanorbruise-velt)

I went to my parents’ church this morning, and the pastor brought up Robin Williams and said something that broke my heart because it is so wrong.  He said something to the effect of Williams not really knowing the meaning of life and if only he had, things might have turned out differently.

I said something about this probably well-intentioned, but totally misguided viewpoint on Twitter last week after reading that terrible post by a certain popular conservative blogger.  The idea that Christians don’t get really depressed because “they know Jesus” is just flat-out false, and it insinuates that Christians who are depressed are just being sinful and that they just need to pray or read their bibles more.

This idea can do so much additional damage to someone who is struggling and I really wish people would educate themselves more, or at least try to harness a little more empathy, before they say something like this from the pulpit.

Also, it appears that Williams was a Christian and with all that he did for others, he seemed to have the meaning of life figured out more than most.

People aren’t talkin about the news, they’re talking about what they think the news is. There is no news channel saying “This is what happened, draw your own conclusions.” We have made this country so bereft of critical thinking, that now we have a problem where we have to teach them to think for themselves.

We have no unified authority, or problem solvers. We have congressman discussing environmentalism, when they don’t understand half the problems our earth is going through. We go to congress instead of going to people who have worked their whole LIFE trying to solve these problems. When it comes to racism, we’re asking a panel of white dudes, when it comes to sexism and woman’s rights we ask a panel of white priests on what they think. IT’S INSANITY! We ask people who are not in the arena they should be speaking in/for.

AND THAT’S WHY WE DON’T trust the media, it’s because they’re not in the arena of black experience, and they don’t care about the black experience, UNTIL something bad happens and they have the tools to paint us as destructive, ugly and evil!

—The response of a Protester in Ferguson who was asked by a reporter as to why most of the protesters didn’t want their faces on tv.  (via sara-the-narco)

(via anarcho-queer)

I charge theological bankruptcy to a Christianity that is silent when unarmed black people are murdered by the state and their killers shielded from punishment.

I charge theological bankruptcy to a Christianity that is silent when black grandmothers are beaten unconscious by law enforcement officers as they seek shelter across a busy highway.

I charge theological bankruptcy to a Christianity that is silent when black teenagers are gunned down like animals, but rushes to promote campaigns against “indecent” music.

I charge theological bankruptcy to a Christianity that is silent about black pain and suffering, but wants to rally to boycott a fictional television show.

I charge theological bankruptcy to a Christianity that is silent when pregnant black women are placed in chokeholds by police, but campaigns outside of abortion clinics to “protect” life.

I charge theological bankruptcy to a Christianity that is silent in the face of urban violence, poverty, and joblessness, but wants to figure out how to plant an urban church from a suburban bubble.

I charge theological bankruptcy to a Christianity that is silent about racial disparities, but keeps singing hymns in which one has to be washed “white as snow.”

I charge theological bankruptcy to a Christianity that is silent about racism, white privilege, and white supremacy, but wants to have conferences about doing “multicultural” ministry.

—James Cone in God of the Oppressed 1975 (via companion-to-owls)

(Source: yolandapierce.blogspot.com, via lillabet)